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https://twitter.com/keanusgf/status/1109843353804386304


19 hours ago
https://www.instagram.com/p/BvZN3RYIitz/

https://news.yahoo.com/keanu-reevess-flight-makes-emergency-landing-takes-road-trip-home-bunch-strangers-184029648.html

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‘John Wick 3’: Chad Stahelski on the Action Scene That’s a “F**k You” to Other Action Scenes

    

March 21, 2019

One of the many things I love about director Chad Stahelski is his unfiltered answers. Usually, when you sit down to talk with someone about their movie or show, they are very careful with what they’re willing to say, never wanting to be the person that rocks the boat.

But last summer, when I got to visit the set of John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum when the sequel was filming outside New York City, one of the best things about the set visit was talking to Stahelski. Not only did he go into great detail about what he wanted to accomplish in the sequel, he was pretty honest about wanting to outdo what other filmmakers have done. 

When talking about the “horse sequence” which features Keanu Reeves riding through New York City beating up guys on a horse, Stahelski said:

“It’s probably the craziest thing I’ve ever done in my career. Same with Keanu. I mean, we’ve all done The Matrixs’, we’ve done 300, and a lot of the Marvel work. It’s all great and they all focus on one or two divisions of action. This is our ‘fuck you’ to everybody else. So, we’re just going to do a lot of everything and better than everyone. That’s a lot to say, right. I’m throwing down the gauntlet. We got tired of everybody getting slacky.”

I love this answer.

After two John Wick films, it would have been easy for Stahelski and Reeves to dial it back a bit and coast on the success of the previous films. But that’s not in their DNA. Both of them are perfectionists, willing to do whatever it takes to make it the best it can be.

In addition, during the wide-ranging interview, Stahelski talked about how the film opens moments after the second film ended, how the sequel has references to Die Hard, The Good the Bad the Ugly, and Akira Kurosawa, what Halle Berry did to train for being the dog handler on set, why it’s important to have big action set pieces throughout the movie, why they cast Boban Marjanovic for the opening action scene, how Reeves is always willing to push himself to the next level, and so much more.

Trust me, if you’re a fan of the John Wick films, you’re going to love reading what Chad Stahelski had to say below. John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum is in theaters May 17, 2019.


Read more... )

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March 21, 2019

John Wick is getting his ass kicked in a massive room full of mirrors. As he stands up trying to get his bearings, he is attacked again and again by ninjas wearing all black. After putting up a worthy defense, one of the ninjas gets in a solid blow and Wick is thrown backwards through a glass case, completely smashing glass shards everywhere. After a moment, I hear director Chad Stahelski call cut.

Let me back up a second.

Last year, when John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum was filming outside New York City, I got to visit the set with a few other reporters. While on set, I got to talk to a number of the people involved in the making of the movie and also watched an incredible-looking action set piece get filmed which featured Keanu Reeves doing his own stunts. Trust me, in take after take, Reeves was giving it everything he had and that included getting knocked down again and again. If you ever wondered if it really was Reeves doing his own stunts in the John Wick movies, I can confirm it is.

During a break in filming, I got to participate in a small group interview with Reeves. He talked about what they were able to do in the third installment that they couldn’t do before, how Parabellum features a horse action scene, how fans will learn more about John Wick’s past and the “High Table”, why he wanted to see John Wick in the desert wearing a suit, the challenges of learning the choreography on the day of filming, and more.

Check out what Keanu Reeves had to say below. John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum is in theaters May 17, 2019.

 

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 http://collider.com/keanu-reeves-interview-john-wick-3/#assassins-ninjas

 

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Derek Lawrence
March 20, 2019 at 01:30 PM EDT

A year ago, much of the EW staff relocated from New York to Los Angeles, blending the two offices together. Very quickly, a group of us bonded over many things, but specifically our endearing love for Keanu Reeves. We started trading adorable GIFs and photos of our beloved star, even naming the group text chain “Keanu Fever.” (A broken phone led to the current sequel “2 Keanu 2 Fever.”) Well, the fever is now hotter than ever — and spreading.

Over the next two days, the world will be graced with an abundance of prime Keanu content, between the first look at his new Toy Story 4 character, a special message about Bill & Ted 3, and the latest trailer for John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum. And all of this comes a week before The Matrix‘s 20th anniversary and a few months before Speed turns 25. We’re truly living in the Keanussaince.
 
Reeves’ career can be separated into three distinct periods. His memorable early career run was really kickstarted by his performance as time-traveling slacker Ted in 1989’s Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure. Two years later, he’d return for Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey, but simultaneously he was beginning to transition into an action star with the perfectly ridiculous Point Break (I honestly don’t think anyone else could pull off playing an FBI agent named Johnny Utah). And where most actors would have just started riding that action train (don’t worry, the bus is coming), Reeves scowled it up as the evil Don John in Kenneth Branagh’s Much Ado About Nothing. Find you an actor that can do Point Break and Shakespeare. Then came Speed, a true adrenaline masterpiece that made everyone — including Sandra Bullock — fall in love with Reeves. His successful decade was capped off by the pop culture phenomenon The Matrix and the role of Neo, for which he’d always be known as — until an vengeful hitman came along years later.

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https://ew.com/movies/2019/03/20/keanu-reeves-fever/
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What is Keanu Reeves’s most iconic role?

Kynan Eng, not an actor

Keanu Reeves has had multiple iconic roles, where “iconic” is defined as having a long-lasting impact on popular culture. So far he has had:

  • Theodore Logan in Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure, which was successful enough to be followed up by a Bogus Journey and now a third film. He played a good-natured high school rock band loser.
  • Johnny Utah in Point Break. He shared the credits with Patrick Swayze on this one. Reeves was in the role of an FBI agent investigating armed robbery.
  • Neo in the Matrix trilogy. He played a hacker in a real/virtual conflict.
  • John Wick in the trilogy of the same name. He played an assassin who exacts revenge on the killers of his dog.

That is quite a record - three movie franchises, plus another that was remade later on (Point Break, in a much weaker version). It is an impressive hit rate for an actor who is often assumed to have roughly the same character as his role in the Bill and Ted movies.

What is even more remarkable is that his iconic characters have been quite different to each other. While actors such as Tom Hanks and Leonardo di Caprio are seen as “serious”, Keanu can also be said to have performed a wide range of characters. He has done his share of romantic roles too.


www.quora.com/What-is-Keanu-Reeves-s-most-iconic-role
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Bill and Ted's Excellent Anniversary: How two guitar-wielding airheads conquered comedy 30 years ago

Ed Power looks back ant the pathologically silly, and surprisingly influential, cult comedy that introduced Keanu Reeves to the world

There are movies that in hindsight were always destined for greatness. And then there is Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure, a time-travel comedy and celebration of lovable goofing / improvised air guitar that to this day feels like a miracle of happenstance. Bill and Ted is so strange that it shouldn’t really exist, let alone bask in ever-lasting acclaim. Yet, on its 30th anniversary this month, it is absolutely beloved. 

“It is a weird movie – it could just as easily could have been a disaster,” was how star Alex Winter (Bill) looked back on the 1989 comedy about two high-school rejects who hopscotch across the centuries collecting historical figures such as Napoleon, Freud and Socrates (pronounced So-krates obviously) in a desperate attempt to graduate from their history class.

“It’s about idiot savants, leaning on the idiot bit,” agreed Chris Matheson, Bill and Ted’s co-writer. “I remember thinking that this movie is either going to do nothing or people are going to discover and love it,” added its director Stephen Herek, interviewed for behind-the-scenes film The Most Triumphant Making of Documentary

Three decades since William S Preston Esquire (Winter) and Ted “Theodore” Logan (Keanu Reeves) first hatched their scheme to ace their history exam by bringing Napoleon and company to class, Bill and Ted remains a joyous anomaly. The humour is pathologically silly, the performances broader than one of the surf boards Reeves would subsequently pose beside in Point Break. And scenes in which Bill and Ted travel by phone-booth along the time-lines – rendered as CGI phone cables – are creaky even for a low-budget action-comedy in 1989. 

Nonetheless, it is universally acclaimed. Surprisingly influential, too. Bill and Ted’s exaggerated surfer dude speak – every second word is “woaaah”, “bogus” or “bodacious” – clearly impacted on Michael Myer’s higher profile, far less funny Wayne’s World (though Myers original Saturday Night Live sketch actually predated Bill and Ted by two years). And, of course, it introduced audiences to Keanu Reeves, who gave us the matinee idol as an eternally confused puppy.
 

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'Bill & Ted' at 30: Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter on How 'Excellent Adventure' Nearly Fell Apart
by David Weiner

From courting Eddie Van Halen and Sean Connery to reshooting the ending and having the film shelved, the stars and director Stephen Herek recall their crazy adventures shooting the comedy classic.

Whoa, dude! Can you believe it’s been three decades since Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure first rocked audiences with their most triumphant time-traveling phone booth journey on the big screen? Well then, this may just blow your mind: if you think about it, we’re like in the future now, even though people call it the present. Right? Mind time travel. Bodacious.

“Time goes by quickly,” Keanu Reeves, aka Ted, tells The Hollywood Reporter. “Over the years it's been really nice to connect with people who love those characters and those films, and it's been fun to hear from fans who have become parents who have shown it to their kids. The ebullient spirit of [Bill and Ted], and the humor of the characters in the film, and the adventure they go on — I think it's still funny.”

The film survived the bankruptcy of its production company, a major role remaining uncast with just weeks left in shooting, and an original ending that was so inadequate that it had to be totally changed. But when Excellent Adventure opened on Feb. 17, 1989, it went on to earn more than $40 million (about $81 million today) and became a cultural touchstone, thanks to the chemistry between Reeves and Alex Winter (aka Bill).

 

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by Bilge Ebiri

The Matrix literally transformed the industry,” says Chad Stahelski, who was Keanu Reeves’s stunt double in the film and went on to become one of the busiest stunt choreographers in the industry. Nowadays, he’s best known for directing the John Wick films, also starring Reeves. (Stahelski directed the first John Wick with fellow stunt veteran David Leitch, and has helmed the subsequent sequels by himself.) But he’d be the first to admit that those movies, not to mention most of the others he’s worked on, would never exist without The Matrix. “Back in the day,” he recalls, “fight scenes were secondary to car chases and horse chases and helicopter chases and motorboat chases.” And what fights there were focused on “single-gun battle stuff or Arnold Schwarzenegger pummeling you to death with his hands.”

But The Matrix showed that a fight sequence could be graceful and surprising, as well as tell a story. Even the nascent superhero-movie genre, which would soon become dominant, took a big page out of the Wachowskis’ playbook. Think of Spider-Man learning to use his powers, or Black Widow speedily dispatching a roomful of villains while still tied to a chair, or Wolverine slicing his way through armies of thugs. “Now,” Stahelski says, “action movies want their big sequences designed around the fights. Think of any action movie in the past decade or so that doesn’t have a bitchin’ fight scene. The Matrix said, ‘Look what you can do with your heroes.’” The director and stunt legend recently took a break from a busy schedule finishing John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum to talk with me about how The Matrix changed movies — and his life — forever.

continue reading here )
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